Tag: mathematics

Our Mathematical Universe

Our Mathematical Universe

| November 2, 2014 | 0 Comments

Why is mathematics so spectacularly successful at describing how the universe works? In this talk MIT physics professor Max Tegmark proposes a radical answer: our physical world is not only described by mathematics, but that it is mathematics or, more specifically, it’s a mathematical structure. A natural question then, of course, is what does this tell us […]

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TEDx: Nature of Mathematics

TEDx: Nature of Mathematics

| September 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

In this video Michael Randy Gabel discusses the nature of mathematics in terms of such concepts as theory, proof, theorem and conjecture. This is done in the context of modern education in mathematics — Gabel discusses how even a little change in the methods of teaching could highly increase the quality of mathematical education. Finally, […]

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Kurt Godel and the Limit of Mathematics

Kurt Godel and the Limit of Mathematics

| September 10, 2014 | 0 Comments

As Mark Colyvan accurately points out in the beginning of this talk, Kurt Godel is less appreciated outside the academic circles than such other giants of science as Einstein, Newton and Darwin, and it’s quite a shame. Kurt Godel is often regarded as one of the most influential logicians, who is famous for the incompleteness […]

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Freeman Dyson: Are Brains Analogue or Digital?

Freeman Dyson: Are Brains Analogue or Digital?

| June 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

In this video Prof Freeman Dyson, one of the greatest living theoretical physicists, talks about the peculiarities of the brain.  In particular, Dyson will give his views on the two systems for processing information — the genome and the brain. The genome, according to Prof Dyson, is digital, in a sense that we can transcribe our […]

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How Greek Maths Changed the World

How Greek Maths Changed the World

| May 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

Everyone’s aware of the invaluable treasures of the ancient Greek culture, philosophy and literature. Not many people, however, think of ancient Greeks as experimentalists and engineers. In this talk Professor Alan Davies presents a number of fascinating practical presentations of the experiments pioneered by ancient Greeks. This will include presentation of the most important Greek discoveries […]

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Contacting ET with Mathematics?

Contacting ET with Mathematics?

| April 12, 2014 | 0 Comments

Here we have a SETI talk delivered a few years ago on a fascinating topic of communication with ET. An interesting problem when considering a potential contact with ET is what form of communication could be best used. When you think about it, any language that we have here on Earth would be useless. Thus […]

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Forbidden Crystal Symmetry in Mathematics and Architecture

Forbidden Crystal Symmetry in Mathematics and Architecture

| February 5, 2014 | 0 Comments

In this recent talk at the RI Roger Penrose, one of the most influential living mathematical physicists, will delve deep into the “forbidden symmetry” of his famous Penrose tiles and the use of non-repeating patterns in design and architecture. Penrose will discuss the origin of these forbidden symmetries and their use in mathematics and architecture. But […]

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Fibonacci Numbers and Inspiration from Mathematics

Fibonacci Numbers and Inspiration from Mathematics

| November 19, 2013 | 0 Comments

In mathematics, the Fibonacci numbers or Fibonacci series are the numbers in the following integer sequence: 0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34,55,89,144… The sequence is named after  Leonardo Fibonacci, who, in his 1202 book Liber Abaci, introduced the sequence to Western European mathematics. This particular sequence has gained popularity due to some amazing features. For instance, the famous Fibonacci spiral, which is an approximation to the golden spiral appears all […]

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